The Week Ahead @ Henry

Coming up this week…

Speaking, In a Sense: Discussion with Jeff Riffell
Sat, May 30, 4 – 5 PM
Combining storytelling and scientific research, Jeff Riffell, UW Assistant Professor of Biology, will lead a conversation on plants that use scents to communicate with insects. This lecture will be held at University of Washington’s Medicinal Herb Garden and Botany Greenhouse.

Photo courtesy of Jeff Riffell.
Photo courtesy of Jeff Riffell.

ArtBreaks happening this weekend…

Beck Tench
Thurs, May 28, 12:30 – 1:00 PM
Join designer and technologist Beck Tench to explore experimentation and space-making in our current exhibitions.

Photo courtesy of Beck Tench. Photo credit: Alan Levine.
Photo courtesy of Beck Tench. Photo credit: Alan Levine.

Megumi Shauna Arai
Sat, May 30, 2:30 – 3:00 PM
Photographer Megumi Shauna Arai will be digging into the themes of urban photography in Ilse Bing: Modern Photographer.

Photo courtesy of Megumi Shauna Arai.
Photo courtesy of Megumi Shauna Arai.

The Week Ahead @ Henry

It’s nearly graduation time which means…

UW School of Art + Art History + Design MFA + MDes Thesis Exhibition

Each year, the Henry presents the University of Washington’s School of Art + Art History + Design’s Master of Fine Arts and Master of Design thesis exhibition. Throughout their program, students consult with academic advisers and working artists to develop advanced techniques, expand concepts, and discuss critical issues. They emerge with a vision and direction for their own work, which is embodied in the pieces they have chosen to present.

 

The exhibition features the work of Maria Rose Adams, Matthew Schau Allen, Tim Coleman, Shaghayegh Ghassemian, Katherine Groesbeck, Scott Ichikawa, Morgan Mangiaruga, Coley Mixan, Ryan Moeck, Sarah Norsworthy, Krista Schoening, Abigail R. Steinem, Amanda C. Sweet, Zheng Wu, Lanxia (Summer) Xie, and Kun Xu.

 

MFA + MDes Thesis Exhibition Patron Preview
Thurs, May 21, 5:30 – 8:00 PM
Henry Contemporary and Patron Circle members are invited to preview the work of UW School of Art + Art History + Design Master of Fine Arts and Masters of Design candidates. This particular exhibition preview has long been a favorite among Henry supporters.

MFA + MDes Thesis Exhibition Opening
Friday, May 22, 7-9 PM
Please join us for the public opening celebration and reception for the MFA +MDes Thesis Exhibition. This opening is being sponsored by Arts Dawgs, a program of ArtsUW. All are welcome!

 

2014 MFA + MDes Preview. Photo credit: Dan Bennett.
Patrons at the 2014 MFA + MDes Preview. Photo credit: Dan Bennett.

Video//Yoga
Thurs, May 21, 12:30 – 1:30 PM
Enrich your yoga experience with Julia Greenway, curator and teacher at Interstitial Theatre. Her immersive yoga classes are taught in accompaniment with video art and engage your senses. Event is public and free.

Julia Greenway leads VIDEO//YOGA.
Julia Greenway leads VIDEO//YOGA.

The Week Ahead @ Henry

Much happening this week: New installations! Parties! Workshops!

 

Hiroshi Sugimoto: Catherine Parr
May 9 – July 26

This photographed image of the wax figure of Henry VIII’s last wife invites questions about perceptions of history and popular culture through Sugimoto’s creation of visual dissonances. Three UW faculty members’ responses to the latest piece in our Viewpoints series are on view alongside the image on our mezzanine.

Hiroshi Sugimoto. Catherine Parr, 1999. Gelatin silver print. Henry Art Gallery, Virginia and Bagley Wright Collection, 2014.185. Courtesy of Fraenkel Gallery, San Francisco. Copyright Hiroshi Sugimoto.
Hiroshi Sugimoto. Catherine Parr, 1999. Gelatin silver print. Henry Art Gallery, Virginia and Bagley Wright Collection, 2014.185. Courtesy of Fraenkel Gallery, San Francisco. Copyright Hiroshi Sugimoto.

The 2015 Brink Bash
Fri, May 15, 6 – 8 PM
Contemporary and Patron Circle members are invited to join us to celebrate the 2015 Brink Award finalists. Meet the seven finalists at Hilliard’s Taproom while enjoying snacks, drinks, and music by KEXP DJ Larry Rose. The Brink Award supports rising regional visual artists “on the brink” of exceptional professional careers. (Wondering how you can be invited to awesome events like this?)

The Brink Bash 2013. Photo credit: Robert Wade.
The Brink Bash 2013. Photo credit: Robert Wade.

On Cultivation and Preservation: Growing a Summer Cocktail Garden with Amy Pennington
Sat, May 16, 11AM & Sat, June 27, 12PM
Renowned author Amy Pennington offers a two-part workshop on creating a summer cocktail garden and a homemade summer amaro, a classic Italian herbal liqueur. Pennington is the author of Urban Pantry: Tips and Recipes for a Thrifty, Sustainable, and Seasonal Kitchen, and the host of the PBS show Check Please! Northwest.
Tickets: $15 per workshop; $25 for both. Limited space available.

Courtesy of Amy Pennington. Photo credit: KK Dundas.
Courtesy of Amy Pennington. Photo credit: KK Dundas.

The Week Ahead @ Henry

In this week’s news…

Ilse Bing: Modern Photographer

May 2 — October 18
Visit the Henry for an exhibition of images by Ilse Bing, an early pioneer of photographing with the 35 mm Leica hand-held camera. A commercial photographer between the late 1920s and 1950s, she is recognized today as one of the key contributors to the development of modern photography.

2015-IlseBing-FA_2012.91_DM_edit
Ilse Bing. Garden wire, 1953. Gelatin silver print. Henry Art Gallery, gift of Yuri and Zoe Gurevich, 2012.91. © Estate of Ilse Bing.

ArtBreak: Mindfulness Meditation
Thurs, May 7, 12:30 PM
Come de-stress and soak in art during this meditation session by engaging and observing your physical, mental, and emotional experiences. Practicing mindfulness helps to promote a general sense of health and well-being. Please check in at the front desk for location information. Event is public and free.

ArtBreak-MindfulnessMeditation
ArtBreak: Mindfulness Meditation

2015 University of Washington MFA + MDes Thesis Exhibition
May 23 — June 21
The exhibition will be featuring the work of graduating Master of Fine Arts and Masters of Design students from University of Washington’s School of Art + Art History + Design.

University of Washington 2014 MFA + MDes Thesis Exhibition. Installation view: Henry Art Gallery, University of Washington, Seattle, 2014. Photo credit: Mark Woods.
University of Washington 2014 MFA + MDes Thesis Exhibition. Installation view: Henry Art Gallery, University of Washington, Seattle, 2014. Photo credit: Mark Woods.

Also,

This is a reminder that GiveBIG is happening tomorrow, Tuesday, May 5th. You have the opportunity to support contemporary art and the Henry by donating online through the Seattle Foundation. Thank you for your continued support!

feature_GiveBIG2015
Image courtesy of Seattle Foundation.

This is the last weekend for “the common S E N S E!”

henry-artbreak-hamilton-26mar15-173
Photo credit: Robert Wade

Ann Hamilton: the common S E N S E has been on view at the Henry since this past October. Hamilton’s large-scale installments have led visitors on an immersive journey that explored her invitation to discover tangible and intangible ways of touch. Using various materials, animals and representations–fur and feather garments, scientific specimens, books, and mechanical bullroarers–Hamilton guided visitors to consider the interdependence between human and non-human animals.

The development of the common S E N S E and its accompanying events and activities provided Hamilton and the Henry the opportunity to collaborate with various partners in the local region–including Seattle Arts and Lectures, UW School of Music, the Burke Museum–just to name a few. The collaborations of the common S E N S E have supported the Henry’s commitment of advancing contemporary art, artists, and ideas.

Ann Hamilton. Photo credit:
Ann Hamilton. Photo credit: Robert Wade

Throughout the duration of this exhibition, singers, dancers, and musicians have surrounded and filled the gallery spaces with their music, footsteps, and spoken word, all in response to the exploration of Hamilton’s work. As Ann Hamilton: the common S E N S E comes to an end, her work continues to inspire.

The Henry invites you to stop by this weekend before the common S E N S E closes on Sunday, April 26th.


Today’s blog post was written by Angie Yin, UW Student and Communication Assistant at the Henry.

Mellifluous Meditation in “the common S E N S E”

Today’s blog post is written by Erika VanHorne, UW senior and choir president of the UW Chorale. 

On the eve of “An Evening in the Galleries with the UW Chorale,” a special event that was held in conjunction with the Henry’s exhibition Ann Hamilton: the common S E N S E, I was nervous. This experience was unprecedented for me as a collegiate choral singer – a deliberate inversion of my ossified conceptions of performance, space, and audience. Yet as the choir reverently filed into the gallery that whirred with otherworldly bullroarers, my sense of trepidation dissipated – replaced with a transfixed reverie.

Audience members expectantly dispersed themselves among the jumbled choristers – but my focus was directed at the machines that crescendoed in tandem with our voices. We moved next to the North gallery where canonical choral literature was sung among images of specimens printed on newsprint. The sheets which rippled softly as the audience quietly stepped around us and them. Next, the choir slowly dissolved and dispersed throughout the Henry – allowing singers to wander as individuals.

Photo credit: Robert Wade.
Photo credit: Robert Wade.

These improvisations took on a meditative nature – as I grasped for the names of the immured specimens through song, I induced an inner dialogue on the nature of human-derived taxonomies. In this time of independent song, a fellow chorister would occasionally sidle up next to me – intertwining a voice with mine in unexpected, sublime euphony. As the boundary between performer and gallery visitor also evaporated, I found another audience – the specimens themselves. Through lyrics, these creatures were anthropomorphized with an intimate sonic tactility – at once haunting and familiar.

Although I visited this exhibition at its opening, this event became an unexpectedly meaningful experience for me. Throughout my university experience, I have found that the most enriching experiences are those that transcend the false dichotomy within the arts and academic disciplines. In this interdisciplinary vein, artist Ann Hamilton and Dr. Giselle Wyers, director of the UW Chorale, crafted an evocative, organic experience through an unexpected fusion of song, art, material culture, and biology that challenged my boundaries as a singer and humanist.

ArtBreak Reflection: Angela Mele on representational drawing

Today’s blog post is a summary of a recent ArtBreak written by the artist who led the session, Angela Mele, a scientific illustrator for under-appreciated species.

Being a fan of Ann Hamilton’s work, and of post-Civil War promotional paintings of railroads and Western landscapes, I decided to try to work out a connection between the two at the ArtBreak session I led two Saturdays ago. Every time I visit the common S E N S E, I think about duality in ‘the sense of touch.’ Touch often implies a benign and loving gesture, yet can also result in taking, holding, owning—as with fur turned to coats, turned to museum objects, and as with the first drawing made of a useful plant turned to exhausted agricultural space.

The ArtBreak attendees were apparently inspired enough by the rather somber connection I drew between scientific illustration and Western expansion to obligingly draw seal intestines and fur coats: none too simple a task. The variation in approaches to drawing the objects in the bassinets was totally exciting (for me, anyway) and hopefully, the “assignment” spurred a unique way of looking at the objects, especially for first-time viewers.

Angela Mele. Lichens of North Florida [detail].
Angela Mele. Lichens of North Florida [detail].
During the exhibition’s opening night I was a reader/scribe, but I soon found myself drawing the luminous sealskin infant parka in front of me instead of reading to it. I figured Ann would be just as happy with that form of documentation, and through careful observation of the crinkled material, I found a sense of wonder and compassion for the object’s history and origins.

I hoped for the ArtBreak participants to find some enjoyable semblance of that experience. Representational drawing, like writing by hand, has become an obscure way of describing the world around us. These days, a drawing or painting of a place can hardly convince us to pack up and head across the country. Yet the deliberate sense of touch required for this kind of drawing–hand on pencil and paper, of eyes closely trained on the subject—makes it an enduringly powerful, intimate, and potentially genuine form of documentation.